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20121224
20130101
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Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)
big gains in professional services. education, health care have also hired a lot of women. but many of the jobs coming back are lower paying than the jobs lost, and we look at this thing also called the real unemployment rate, underemployment. his 14.4% in november according to the government including unemployed, working part-time who want a full-time gig and other satached to the workforce. here for advice, carolyn, long-term or under employed, how can they brand themselves for a fire hiring boom in the next few years? >> have a story apart from job search. employers want to see you're busy, staying active and current, still in and around companies and other people. you want activity, whether it's projects or research you're doing. >> fill the gap on the resume with peoples names who you meet. >> stay in the professional groups. remember, mine orpty, women's group, even if you don't have a job you'refantastic way to network. >> and find a nonprofit that can use whatever skill it is you want to be using in the private work force. whether it's planning parties or being their account
, obviously, let's say something passes through the senate. the guess would be, or the educated guess is that it's going to then win a large majority of democratic votes, but because you still are in the minority, you would need 20, 25 -- i'm kind of back of the notebook sketching here, but somewhere around that -- of republicans. i'd assume that you've had conversations either this week, last week, weeks before, with some of these folks. do you believe there are two dozen republicans that, let's say john boehner lets this bill come up. do you believe there are two dozen republicans who vote for it? >> i do believe that there are at least two dozen who would vote for the kind of agreement that we're hearing about being put together in the senate. you know, of course, tom cole, a very conservative member from oklahoma, was urging his colleagues some time ago to get this behind them at the $250,000 threshold. so, i certainly think that there are that number of republicans who would vote for it. the question is, if it's in that range, if we're talking about only about 25 or so republican
for students and educators alike that the group could, said could be tailored by any school to suit its% individual needs. lou. lou: james, the two sides in this gun control debate, are now, if you will forgive the expression, they're armed up and going at it and getting ready for major confrontation. is there any compromise available in this, in this debate? >> as with the fisl cliff it doesn't appear readily discernable, lou. president obama released a video message vowing to fight for new gun control laws early next year. the down tours of this debate are already taking shape as leading democrats are pressing for renewed assault weapons ban and for new limit on semitick ammunition magazines. a leading senate democrat says she favored schools being allowed to have armed guards if they so choose but she then cited the columbine massacre. >> in fact there were two armed law enforcement officers w twice engaged the shooters at column bind. that didn't prevent 15 from being killed and 23 wounded. >> however opponents of the assault weapons ban say that law was also in effect when columbin
to educate you if i didn't just think it was not just theoretically possible but actually feasible for the vast majority of people to succeed at managing their own money. so if that's the case, then why is investing so darn difficult? how many people struggle to make money in the stock market in how the heck can i believe it possible for you to beat the average, the big benchmarks when so many fund managers fail to do so? simple. you can do it but you have to do it the right way. one of the biggest obstacles to successful investing is a lack of clarity about just what investing is supposed to mean. i have seen countless people try to follow the conventional wisdom about money management, only to have their investments wiped out because the conventional wisdom is wrong. and the worst part is those people had no idea they were making a mistake. they actually thought they were being responsible. in other words, to borrow a phrase from "cool hand luke" -- >> what we've got here is failure to communicate. >> and i'm saying it boss. that's why tonight i want to demystify the concept of l
's author and educator lou heckler. >> in the past few weeks, i have lost three friends. i know it's part of getting older, and it still gets you thinking: how will we be measured? poet philip james bailey writes: we live in deeds, not years, in thoughts, not breaths, in feelings, not figures on a dial. there are many deeds to recount in business: profit and loss estimates, new product introductions, new markets entered and conquered. all are notable deeds in their own way. for my part, i could think of degrees earned, positions held, places traveled, ideas shared. somehow they pale compared to the older woman who approached me after a speech i gave at a senior citizens group in florida. i had talked about the healing power of humor and she waited tentatively to speak to me when the speech was over. thank you so much, she said, taking my hands in hers. i told her i should be thanking her, this was a wonderful audience. no, you don't understand, she continued. my husband died seven months ago. today is the first day i've laughed. in all my years, that's a deed i'll always remember, a gift
's director of consumer education at credit.com. gerri, welcome. > > thank you. > what happened? > > there is a lot of frugal fatigue out there. we have been so careful with our spending for the past few years i think some consumers said "i deserve to buy myself something, not just other people gifts this year." so what we are seeing is, before the holidays, fico did a survey where they found that a slightly increased number of people said they would take three months or more to pay off their credit card debt that they plan to run up before the holidays. of course, now we have to see exactly what the numbers were after the holidays. but, generally i think that consumers are a little bit more optimistic with their spending this year. > why did this happen? we have been trained not to use our credit cards as much, not to max them out. why did this reverse itself? why do people feel so confident? > > we have seen a couple of trends when it comes to credit cards: we do see a lot of consumers who are using their credit cards to max out rewards, because the rewards programs, frankly,
, education and state and local aid. obviously states like hawaii, places like virginia that are more dependent on federal spending would get hit harder than other states, sue. so write down the numbers. write down the percentages and see how much any view they come up with brings it down to figure out what the macro economic effects will be and micro economic effects. simon? >> all right, steve. will do. we are still awaiting president obama to see how things are taking shape on parts of the deal for washington. back in two minutes. sfls welcome back to prounch. in just a few moments the president will take to the foed poed yum there to talk about the fiscal cliff negotiations. john, you have outlined what we believe are some of the components of this possible deal. given what you know, which side gave more at this point? >> i think everybody is giving. look, the president wanted, and democrats wanted, having campaigned on it, $250,000 threshold for family income for the return to the clinton jer gentleman tafrm rates of 39.6. republicans didn't want tax increases on anybody. democra
us by telling us that, you know, our education is going to suffer. we're going to be stupid without a large federal bureaucracy running education. that's not true. stuart: when do you think we will come to the day though when in america we really cut back, i mean really cut, the educational bureaucracy, for example, the energy department bureaucracy, anybody's bureaucracy, we have never seen it in the past. >> it is going to happen when it hurts us in our wallets. right now the game is, and this is both sides bear some of the blame, the game is kick the can down the road. stuart: the democrats and the president will simply blame the rich, they will blame the banks, they will blame wall street. they will blame somebody. >> right. they can do that until the middle class feels it in their pocketbooks. that's what i'm saying. david: the point is all this new tax money that's coming in assuming they get it, it is not going to pay down the debt, it is going to go for more government spending. >> that's right. that's why republicans should stand fast, and that's why they should be against
for education and food stamps and nutrition programs and medicaid. that is something that's great concern to democrats. >> what are they giving up on spending? >> what are we giving up on spending? well, actually, there's a $1.2 trillion on the table right now under our democrats who say let it go. let the across the board cuts take place. because at least in that case, defense bears a part of the burden. and under the sequester, medicaid and some other things are protected. so there's still a $1.047 trillion in spending cuts in the sequester that there are a lot of democrats who are willing to let happen. >> unfortunately we have to leave it there for the moment. lots of things, of course, happening in this hour. but we really do appreciate you joining us today. >> my pleasure. happy new year. you too. >>> howard dean has been on our show many times and he says he wants to go over the fiscal cliff. the former dnc is here and he's going to join us next and tell us what he sees in the situation as it stands. and having an invt like northern trust by your side makes all the difference. we a
to educate the country on the wholistic approach you're talking about. he has to get out of the white house more. he should take a train and go around the country and talk to people about all of these issues so you can mobilize public sentiment. as lincoln said, without it nothing can happen. and that's the goal of the second term. >> i think the gun question, though, is almost less they question of presidential leadership and cultural leadership from people like tom and like me. we are the only two gun owners here. but if you're a moderate, if you're a quail hunter or dove hunter, you have to get into this and say, look, assault weapons are not what this is about. as president clinton said, he had never known anyone that needed an assault weapon to kill a deer. and this is a case where if people, if this is not an organic movement from the country, it's not going to work. it can't come from top down. >> i want to inject the larger political point. we have midterm elections coming up in two years. there's the trench warfare on the budget and entitlements which could take a long time, and gu
educating them. with that said, i'm concerned about investors in general not really understanding what they have, and if interest rates go up, even a small amount, there could be negative rates of returns on securities or funds and how will they react, particularly in an environment where there's a potential for less liquidity. dagen: washington, as they have in the past, pardon the language, screws things up, though, then the fed a likely to stay accommodative; right? in the coming year, do you think? >> they absolutely are. i think it's probably, at least near term, the right policy. my concern is if inflation unexpectedly rises for some reason, will they be quick enough to pull away all the enormous liquidity in the market place? they feel they can, but we have seen instances before in the past 20-30 # years where that's not been the case, and it's going to be pretty hard to figure out so, to me, that's one of the bigger, longer term issues not to come into play, at least through much of 2013. dagen: bob, really quickly, what do you like owning right now? what helps you sleep? what
-time care. pokes in this country are committed to education and educating their children. the last thing they want to go is child care. but they're going to more part-time care. that creates a different view to our franchise owners and how they hire people and hours that they can provide to staff that they're limiting. >> greg, am i wrong in saying that i would assume if you're in the bookkeeping business, this on a short-term basis has to be a good thing? >> it actually is a great thing. yeah, we hit the market in two different areas. one, we obviously offer an opportunity for a group or individual to get into the business and start a career or wealth builder. but obviously, we have a touch with the end users, the 30 plus million around the u.s. and soon to be canada, as well. and supplying that small business owner with not only a bookkeeping service, but also data and analytics to help them run the business and make some business decisions as they grow. >> now, you're a franchise model. if, for example, whether it's dividends or capital gains and that goes up, does that change the gam
of them deal with social media, health care, education, gay rights and child safety. on thursday, it is time to make up your mind on the gift that you are not in love with. that is right, national returns day. more than half a million gifts are expected to be returned by the u.s. postal service alone and others are bound to be regifted it ends up. you know who you are. and on friday, the december
the code, freeing up money to invest in things like education. nobody's talking about that anymore. you know, right now they're really struggling to figure out what to do with the tax cuts. and, you know, they're not even talking about the sequester very much anymore, which would -- you know, the tax cuts, they would hurt immediately. and everybody's taxes are going up next year if you're a wage earner one way or another because of the payroll tax holiday expiring. but there's a whole host of issues and they're not going to be able to deal with all of them. it's become very immediate and it looks like the small deal is going to leetch whole bunch of things for them to do next year. >> good point. we'll get to this more later in the show. the taxes are where all the political heat is, but the discussion is actually about the more important things, all of those cut, the structure of our government. we'll discuss this more, annie. steven mentioned his name. coming up, this man may be the most feared man in washington. >> if i went and became a tibetan monk on the top of some mountain somew
, by thinking about where want your education to lead, while you're still in school, you might find the best route... leads somewhere you weren't even looking. let's get to work. >>> we are back. ali, if if people knew what happened in the breaks on this show. >> i was not planning in the long term planning i was expecting to be somewhere traveling and i was not expecting to be here, so everything is upended and as a result, i have my dinner here and chinese food and little coke zero to wash it down. >> i aid -- i said, ali, you have all of that stuff and you have coke zero. it is a good thing that you are charming. >> yes, because i am not winning anybody over with my looks and tight body. >> back to the news. >> back to the news. >> everybody up to the speed on the talks of the looming fiscal cliff, ali. >> not a surprise that democrats and republicans are not budging from the decisions, and here is a live picture and something is going on there, because the lights are on at capitol hill, and optimists hoped that a deal would vote on something tonight, but we know that the senate will not
'm a financial adviser and longtime viewer who appreciates what you do to educate and motivate investors. >> thank you. >> caller: i'm wondering if you would share your objective criteria are for investors to use in determining best of breed. thank you. >> well, i've got to tell you, best of breed, start with record dividends and then i go to how a company has done and consistently in good and bad times, and, yes, for best of breed i actually look at the product itself. is the product something i want to use, a bank i want to go to? is it, to use the danny meyer phrase, a great restauranteur, is it the one that's most hospitable to shareholders? anyway, new diversification. it's important. it's what we're preaching tonight. make sure your portfolio is home to some gold, a high yielder, okay. you need a growth stock. you know what, a spec, and then you need geographically safe area for one of them. i'll teach you how to pick the best ones. i want you to be comfortable with your own portfolio. "mad money" will be right back. >> don't miss a second "mad money." follow @jimcramer on twitter.
were the for-profit education companies included apollo which operates the yurvet of phoenix. right now the dow's up 138 points. back to you. >> thank you very much for that. so with less than 20 minutes to go in the last trading session of 1202012, what do you need to know about 2013? >> he says there's some key factors that will offset any risk from the fiscal cliff. chris constantine sees more opportunity in the international market compared to the united states markets heading into the new year. they both join ugh us to break it down for us. john, we're all marveling in washington right now. >> the best deal would be if they got a deal that did something to correct the structural problems. but i think not going over the cliff is probably not good. it wouldn't have been that bad anyways. it would have gone back a day or two into the new year. >> what do you make of the market the fact it's up 140 points now and we don't have a deal yet? >> i think it's because the cliff talk was a bit like a magician's left hand. when he's doing the trick, he's distracting you with the left hand. i t
of that is also to educate other ceos about the importance of aviation. you talk about the tax environment. 20% of the price of your ticket is taxation. you talk about, again the regulatory environment. thees a ease of regulation in a deregulated environment. global competitiveness. you talk about the pricing of oil. this is why we're down in washington, really trying to educate and ceos elected are important in this industry. >> you have players trying to take market share. are you seeing impact of private jet companies sprouting up all over the place, trying to get folks to do private jets? >> really not yet. >> not yet. >> what i hear, is it the corporate jet is not available, i'm flying jetblue. i love that compliment. someone flying from teterboro to west palm beach, they are taking care of that corporation. >> good strategy in teterboro, i'll tell that you. >> it works for us. >> thanks so much pch wonderful to see you and merry christmas. happy holidays. you've heard concerns, tax implications, even recession fears if we go over the fiscal cliff. what happen fess we don't in steve liesm
with skills, a good level of education. we can take advantage of that, even compared with our peers so let's do everything we can to -- the benefit of these positive advantages and not be -- not present people to invest in france because they might be afraid of a lack of visibility on the taxpayers or too high taxes. >> but do you think it's sending the right signal to investors when it's threatening to nationalize a factory? >> no, certainly not. these are not the right ones and clearly what an investor needs is, again, confident. immediately going forward, illustrate will not suffer from taxes or a potential threat. the message should be positive for investors, not just french one, but also we have a strategy to reduce stability. >> but do you understand some people could be forced to leave the country because of increasing back pressure? >> there is a lot of debate around that. my view is that is not the right thing to think that you can put people, like, in jail. it is important to be competitive by providing a favorable environment, something where people will want to stay, invest, cr
. and they're not addressing the real problems of america, which are jobs, productivity, education, science research, and withering infrastructure. this is appalling, and the american people should watch whatever's happening with a sense of disgust. >> you feel clearly very strongly. >> yes. >> why do you think we've got to this stage? what could turn it into a more positive narrative? >> i think we are at this place because the role of muddle in politics has overwhelmed, the lobbying process has overwhelmed the sound financial planning for the american people. we have a mess in the health care spending in the out years, which is real. but the costs of providing medical care through pharmaceutical monopolies, insurance monopolies and hospitalization monopolies means american people pays more than double what the rest of the people pay in the world. we're not fixing that. >> diana, is that your assessment of what we witnessed today? >> we are not making real attempts to cut spending, which is the problem. we have $16 trillion in debt. $1 trillion deficit. and what we're talking about today i
in 2 1/2 years. and barnes & noble chairs rallying over british publishing and education company pearson says it will invest $85.9 million in nook media in exchange for a 5% equity stake. >>> well, houston's port is a big employer and a very busy one, one of the busiest in the world, but it could be stalled by a labor strike that threatens the city, as well as more than a dozen others along the eastern seaboard and gulf coast. annise parker is the mayor of houston. mayor parker, great to have you with us. >> glad to be with you. >> your port handles about 70% of the shipping container business along the gulf coast, so this could be a major blow how will it impact your city, exactly? >> of our nine terminals, two are container terminals, and it will shut those down. 70 to 150 workers will be not showing up to work, will shut down access to those terminals now. we will continue to do business through our other terminals, but it could have a really severe and immediate impact on not just what happens at the port, but this is about cargo moving to other places. so it's everything up
can look at what your health insurance premiums are doing, your education bills but y favorite site is something called shadow stats, they track cpi and it varies between 8, 10, 12 percent depending on which versions you use. because every administration seems to adjust those figures to proactively reflect and keep them down. and the government has every incentive to do that because cost of living increases are tied to that, military spending is tied to that, a lot of things are tied to cost of livings increases that are in fact tied to inflation. david: let's face it, the federal reserve has become a branch of the u.s. government essentially. it's supposed to be a private institution. it's been essentially printing money to bail out all of the free spending politicians. that means less money in our pocket. >> well, that's right. you know, this illusion that government spending is in fact going to make up for the private spending gap is just that, it's an illusion. it hasn't worked that way throughout history on anything other than a short-term basis. it may stave off the pain now,
microdevices, it, too, is down 1 this morning, down 55% so far this year. online education company apollo group down 62% for the year, down again as of this morning. time to give you a couple of winners. start with bank of america, more than doubled this year, up 107%, it's up again right now, 10 cents higher. whirlpool up 110% this year up 41 cents. sprint nextel. up 137% this year, it, too, is up again this year and then pulte homes up 182% and yes, it is up again as of right now. the big losers all down, the big winners all up this thursday morning. then we've got facebook's founder, mark zuckerberg's sister, posts a private photo on facebook and sees it go public. she's not happy. what did she not understand about her brother's company? we'll discuss it. first, are things really as bad as the media makes it out to be john stossel says, no, they're not. this is one of my favorites. government cannot make man richer, but it can make man poorer, oh, yes, it can. ♪ [ male announcer ] at scottrade, we believe the more you know, the better you trade. so we have ongoing webinars and interactive
and education company that barnes & noble owns, it consists of the digital e-reader as well as 674 bookstores across the u.s. that is why the stock is up. it is under some pressure. holiday sales at barnes & noble will miss expectations. the milk is one of the reasons behind that weakness. back to you, adam. david: see you at the top of the hour. shares of hewlett-packard dragging the dow down. say, what? we had this year's most annoying phrases. you know, like, you know. just saying. you will love them. next. ♪ david: we have a deal between potential striking dock workers and port operators and that will prevent a strike that would have prevented things going to texas. >> at least one end of your cliff now reverted. this would have had major economic impact all across the country. no east coast and gulf coast port strike will be happening. however, both sides still have negotiating to do giving each other a 30 day extension. they are salary supplements that are essentially greater money to the workers based on the greater the weight of those containers. the owners wanted those path. the wo
in things like education, things like infrastructure, that help our economy grow. and keep in mind that the threat of tax hikes going up is only one part of this so-called fiscal cliff that everybody has been talking about. what we also have facing us starting tomorrow are automatic spending cuts that are scheduled to go into effect and keep in mind some of these spending cuts, that congress has said will automatically go into effect have an impact on our defense department but they also have an impact on things like head start. so there are programs that are scheduled to be cut that we're suing -- using an axe instead of a scalpel, may not always be the smart text cuts. so that is a piece of business that still has to be taken care of. i want to make clear that any agreement we have to deal with these automatic spending cuts being threatened for next month those also have to be balanced because my principle has always been let's do things in a balanced, responsible way. that means revenues have to be part of the equation in turning off the sequester in eliminating automatic spendi
on friday at 5:30 p.m. eastern. if you want more education about currencies, go to currency class at money in motion.cnbc.com. >> an article in today's "new york times" finds once traditional dating priorities like having a good job, physical chemistry, may not matter if your credit score is less than attractive. the "times" interviewed more than 50 daters all around the u.s. they were all under 40 years old. brings us to this morning's squawk on the tweet. what's the most important financial question to ask on a first date. tweet us @squawk street. are we getting any responses? >> i don't know. can you imagine opening up that conversation? so, what's your credit score? are you using experian or transunion? >> i would expect you to do that on a date. >> what? why would you select me? i feel like that's not a compliment. >> this is a question you ask when you're over 40. the responders in that were all under 40. >> that's true. more to do with maybe a nest egg, so to speak, right? >> you can be more reckless. >> oh, yeah. >> london, here we come. >> retailers feeling the effect of slow holi
's education. that group peaked in 2000 in terms of americans, fell since then, turns in 2013, starts to grow and it will be bigger than the baby boom is over the next decade. >> the good times are coming, tobias? >> we think so. >> the baby boomers taking their money out. >> consumer finance, happy you brought that up, almost like you logged it in for me. survey financials shows people post-65 take their equities down. the good news is the baby boom average age is 55. so we've got ten years to worry about that. >> we do our work. >> tobias, good to see you. happy holidays. >> happy holidays to you. your little hockey player? >> the day before christmas, of course, still no fiscal cliff resolution. the $500 billion in spending cuts and tax increases start on january 1st unless the white house and congress reach some sort of agreement. we're joined by former pennsylvania governor ed rendell, co-chair of the campaign to fix the debt. and a cnbc contributor. governor, happy holidays. good morning to you. >> good morning, guys. >> so we're sitting here wondering what can be done in the next seven
, and research laboratories, educational situations, they're looking all over the country at what a sort of mindless 10% cut means or whatever. so they are really at the point of wanting some spes if ity and having someone look at, should we do this program or that program? and that's really what the congressman's going to have to do. >> yeah. i just -- i wonder how that shifts things now? because the narrative right now, and maybe the public will buy it right now, is that the republicans have been obstructionist about the tax issue. once we get past january 1st and you get everything you want, you won't even have to argue about $400,000, $500,000, $1 million. i don't know really if the president has had any reason to negotiate in good faith. >> he knew we were going over -- he knew he could get back to 39.6, and you saw geithner. in fact, congressman, i think we should have learned from this. check out this quick sound bite. >> is the administration prepared to go over the fiscal cliff? >> oh, absolutely. again, there's no prospect to an agreement that doesn't involve those rates going
Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)